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Conditions Treated by Nutritionists


In Her Own Words: Living With Anorexia and Bulimia


High Cholesterol
You have this condition if there are high levels of cholesterol in the blood. There are three parts of cholesterol: Low density lipoproteins (LDL)-known as bad cholesterol. It causes build up of cholesterol and other fats in the blood vessels. High LDL levels can cause artery and heart disease.High density lipoproteins (HDL)-known as good cholesterol. It can remove cholesterol and other fats from the blood vessels. High levels of HDL can protect against heart disease.Triglycerides-a common form of fat in the body. Often elevated in people with diabetes or certain genetic conditions.Particles-proteins associated with certain types of cholesterols in the body. These may be a better signal about your risk of developing disease in the blood vessels.

Bulimia Nervosa
Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder. People who have it eat very large amounts of food (binging) and many also use inappropriate means to rid their bodies of the food (purging). Purging may be caused by vomiting, laxatives, or water pills. Individuals use this cycle to prevent gaining weight. These behaviors last for more than three months for at least two times a week. Individuals are overly concerned with weight and body image. In some, excessive exercise or fasting may replace or supplement purging.

Anorexia
Anorexia is an Eating Disorders. It occurs when a person's obsession with diet and exercise leads to extreme weight loss. The disorder is considered if a person refuses to maintain a body weight at or above 85% of their ideal body weight. It can be fatal.

Obesity
Overweight and obesity are defined as having a body mass index [BMI] greater than or equal to 25 and 30, respectively. In children, the BMI is based on growth charts. Being overweight and obese occur when calorie intake is consistently greater than the number of calories burned through activity and basic metabolic processes.

Type 1 Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes is a disorder caused by autoimmune distruction of the insulin secreting cells of the pancreas resulting in the body's inability to produce sufficient insulin to meet bodily needs. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows the body to use sugar for energy. Without insulin, glucose (sugar) from the carbohydrate food you eat cannot enter cells. This causes glucose to build up in the blood, leaving your body cells and tissues starved for energy. While a variety of tissue transplantation techniques are under development and some genetically-based treatments have been proposed, at this point in time, the only widely-available treatment for type 1 diabetes is the injection of insulin.

Type 2 Diabetes
Related Media: Diabetes - Your Management Plan

Type 2 Diabetes is primarily a disorder in which the cells in the body are not responding to the high levels of insulin circulating in the body. The body becomes increasingly resistant to insulin. In end-stage type 2 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas are not producing enough insulin.

High Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is abnormally high blood pressure with no known cause. Blood pressure measurements are read as two numbers: Systolic pressure: higher number, normal reading is 120 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) or lessDiastolic pressure: lower number, normal reading is 80 mmHg or less

Malabsorption
Malabsorption is the inadequate absorption of nutrients from the intestines. Malabsorption may involve failure to absorb certain vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, proteins, or fats. The condition is associated with a number of diseases that affect the intestines or other areas of the gastrointestinal tract.

Obesity-Children and Teens
Being overweight or obese means your weight is above an ideal weight range. Appropriate weight ranges are calculated using the body mass index (BMI). For anyone under 20 years of age, these scales are based on height, weight, sex, and date of birth. Child and teen BMI results differ from adult BMI. This is because they are compared to the results of other children and teens in the same age range. This extra step takes into account that children and teens are still growing. BMI levels for anyone under age 20 are as follows:Underweight-BMI at or below the 5th percentile for the age groupDesired weight-BMI between the 5th-84th percentiles for the age groupOverweight-BMI between the 85th-94th percentiles for the age groupObese-BMI at or above the 95th percentile for the age group