Hydrocephalus Prevention

Is it possible to prevent Hydrocephalus? Read what the medical community suggests for prevention methods in the condition center at ThirdAge.com.

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How to Prevent Hydrocephalus


There are no known ways to prevent all cases of hydrocephalus. In general:

  • Get regular prenatal care.
  • Protect yourself or your child from head injuries.
  • Keep your child's vaccines up to date.

Preliminary research suggests that some cases due to brain bleeding in the newborn period may be preventable. Cytomegalovirus or toxoplasmosis acquired by a mother during pregnancy may be a cause of hydrocephalus in a newborn baby. Mothers may reduce their risk of being infected with toxoplasmosis with these steps:

  • Carefully cook meat and vegetables.
  • Correctly clean contaminated knives and cutting surfaces.
  • Avoid handling cat litter, or wear gloves when cleaning the litter box.

Pet rodents (mice, rats, hamsters) often carry a virus called lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCV). LCV infection acquired from pets during pregnancy can lead to hydrocephalus. This is preventable by avoiding rodent contact.

Infection with Chickenpox or Mumps during or immediately after pregnancy may also lead to hydrocephalus in the baby. Both of these infections can be prevented with vaccination. Other preventable infections may also cause hydrocephalus. People who have risk factors for hydrocephalus should be carefully monitored. Immediate treatment might prevent long-term complications.


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Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright ©2014 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved. Source: EBSCO