Are dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt) bad for you?

Know the answer? Share your knowledge and answer this Osteoporosis question.

Learn

Take Action

< Osteoporosis Questions

Questions About Osteoporosis


Are dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt) bad for you?
I'm a vegetarian but I still eat dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt and my favorite food in the whole world .... *ice cream* :D i don't want to get osteoporosis when im older. because i have all the risk factors: i'm female, im short and light , and my grandma has it. but i read that dairy products are bad for your bones . i cant remember why though. but it makes sense. because americans eat a lot of dairy and they have a high rate of fractures & osteorporosis but japanese people hardly ever eat dairy products and they're really healthy...... is veganism (no eggs & no dairy) a better option ???
Answers
...Dairy is good for your bones. They have calcium. Next time you look at health info, try sites with .gov or .org
All people become to the fat so they used to the meat so they don't take the milk so who to impress the vegetarian so that i want to impress the all people. I want to make many types sweet by the milk. When they used the sweet then they take the test by the my product. But there are so hard to conduct the company because the there are situation is too much bad not the secure by the government.Otherwise, i want to win by the conduct the factory.
They're fine. If you consume an insane amount of dairy, it can be bad for you. In reasonable quantities it's fine. People have been eating/drinking dairy products for the last 10000 years, it's not going to start being bad now. The main reason Americans have Osteoporosis is that they're all fat craps.
Being a vegetarian saves you around 30% from the risk of the disease. Surprisingly,milk is not a very good source. Sure, it's loaded with calcium, but it's not as easy for the body to absorb it as the calcium in kale or swiss chard, and the presence of protein, fats, and other products can cause the body to lose calcium from bones. The most healthful calcium sources are green leafy vegetables and legumes, or "greens and beans" for short. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collards, kale, mustard greens, Swiss chard, and other greens are loaded with highly absorbable calcium and a host of other healthful nutrients. More click for more dnt forget to conc on vit D along with Ca and P
good and bad cheese has fat a little is good for you too much is bad for you because it has high level of cholesterol milk is good for u bcuz it has calcium in it and its good for developing bone get a organic milk yogurt is good for u the benefits of yogurt that contain live "good" bacteria healthwise, but definitely don't think that it is "strongly believed that dairy is the most common cause of acne." Pooh! Check out some of these links for the real "causes" of acne: http://www.google.com/search?q=acne+caus… As for the flavoring added to some yogurts (and sugar), that isn't as important as the brand in terms of gut healthfulness. Some brands start out with live cultures but overheat them so much, etc, that by the time they get to you, many or all of the live cultures are dead making those "yogurts" just expensive "pudding" (not Yoplait though**, and not familiar with Forme). So anytime you buy yogurt for its probiotic effects, be sure the container says "contains" live cultures/bacteria, not "made with" live cultures.*** Do remember that commercial (flavored) yogurt has calories and lots of sugar, and can have more or less fat depending on which variation you choose. Personally, I'm not happy with any artificial sugars so don't buy anything that contains them. (I do make my own yogurt though, so can choose regular sugar or honey or whatever natural sweetener I want, as well as flavoring each serving in many different ways just as I'm about to eat it.) If you want to read more about yogurt--why it's good for you, how to pick it and flavor it, etc., check out my answers in these previous questions: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?… http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;… http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;… ** according to the Yoplait website: ". . .Look for the National Yogurt Association Live and Active culture seal or the words "contains live and active cultures." All Yoplait products provide the benefit of live and active cultures." And the YoPlus, etc., just contains another bacteria they like to market as having beneficial gut effects (like Activia) when actually all true yogurts already do that! ***(...by law in the U.S., to be called "yogurt" the product must contain two particular strains of "good" bacteria --lactobacillus bulgaricus and streptococcus thermophilus-- but yogurts can always add other strains if they want too since there are loads of them and many that are similar to each other but can be tweaked a bit)
Dairy is good and bad in ways. Good for the calciums and vitamins, but you can also get calcium from soy milk and other things. Bad because dairy products have been linked to autism in children. Also there can be lots of fat in milk and cheese.
Ice cream is not healthy at all. Try soy ice cream or rice ice cream instead. http://www.tastethedream.com/products/rd_frozen.php Eggs are good for you if they are the kind without saturated fat, like the egg beater eggs. http://www.eggbeaters.com/ Yogurt is good for you if its the fat-free kind. I would not eat that all the time though as it can be high in sugar. Cheese is not healthy at all. I would try to eat that very rarely. Limit your consumption of cheese to once a month.

Latest Articles


Latest Quiz


Osteoporosis: the Basics
Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright ©2014 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved. Source: EBSCO