What is Cystocele/Rectocele

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Cystocele/Rectocele Definition


Connective tissue separates the pelvic organs. The tissue, called fascia, is attached to nearby muscles. When healthy, the fascia and muscles support the bladder, vagina and rectum. Defects in the fascia can cause cystoceles and rectoceles.

In a cystocele there is a defect in the fascia between the bladder and vagina. This allows a part of the bladder wall to bulge into the vagina. There are three grades of cystocele:

  • Grade 1: mildest form, where the bladder drops only partway into the vagina
  • Grade 2: moderate form, where the bladder has sunken far enough to reach the opening of the vagina
  • Grade 3: most severe form, where the bladder sags through the opening of the vagina

Cystocele

© 2009 Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

In a rectocele there is a defect in the fascia between the rectum and the vagina. This allows part of the wall of the rectum to bulge into the vagina.

Rectocele

© 2009 Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

The sooner that a cystocele or rectocele is treated, the better the outcome. If you suspect you have this condition, contact your doctor.


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Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright ©2014 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved. Source: EBSCO