Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Care

Learn what care is required for the Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy procedure. Find out what you need to do prior to the procedure, how long it will take, if you will be required to stay in the hospital and what the postoperative care is.

Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Details


What to Expect Prior to test

Leading up to the test:

  • Your doctor may instruct you to take antibiotics.
  • Arrange for a ride home after the test. Also, arrange for help at home.
  • The night before, eat a light meal. Do not eat or drink anything for 6-10 hours before the test.
  • Talk to your doctor about your medicines. You may be asked to stop taking some medicines up to one week before the procedure, like:
    • Anti-inflammatory drugs (eg, aspirin )
    • Blood thinners, like clopidogrel (Plavix) or warfarin (Coumadin)

Description of the Test

To numb your throat, you may be given an anesthetic solution to gargle. Or, your throat may be sprayed with a numbing medicine. You may be given a sedative through an IV. This is to help you relax during the test.

You may be asked to lie on your left side. You will have monitors tracking your breathing, heart rate, and blood oxygen levels. If sedation is used, you will be given supplemental oxygen to breathe through your nose.

A mouthpiece will be positioned to help keep your mouth open. During the test, a small suction tube will be used to clear saliva and fluids from your mouth. The endoscope will be lubricated and placed in your mouth. You will be asked to try to swallow it. Then, it will be carefully and slowly advanced down your throat. It will be passed through your esophagus and into your stomach and intestine.

While the endoscope is being advanced, your doctor will view the images on the screen. Air may be passed through the endoscope into your digestive tract. This will be done to smooth the normal folds in the tissues, allowing your doctor to view the tissue more easily. Tiny tools may be passed through the endoscope in order to take biopsies or do other tests.

After Test

After the test, you will be observed for an hour. Then, you will be allowed to go home.

When you return home after the test, do the following to help ensure a smooth recovery:

  • Rest when you get home.
  • Ask your doctor if you can resume your normal diet. In most cases, you will be able to.
  • Sedatives can slow your reaction time. Do not drive or use machinery for the rest of the day.
  • Avoid alcohol for the rest of the day.
  • Be sure to follow your doctor's instructions .

How Long Will It Take?

About 10-15 minutes

Will It Hurt?

Yes, you will have discomfort during the test. Your throat will be sore. Also, you may feel bloated after the test.


Learn

Learn what Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy is
What Is
Learn what the procedure is. Find out how it is performed.
Reasons For Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Reasons For
Find out why and when this procedure should be done.
Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Complications
Complications
Learn about possible complications and what might increase the risk of them.
Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Details
What to Expect
Find out how long it will take, what they will be doing and what to expect afterwards.
Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Results
Results
What are the next steps and other possible tests needed after you have received the results.
When to Contact Doctor about Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Call Your Doctor
What to look out for and when to call your doctor after a procedure has been done.

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Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright ©2014 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved. Source: EBSCO