Rin Tin Tin: Dog's Life Documented in New Book

Rin Tin Tin the XXII, who recently presided over the ringing of the closing bell at the New York Stock exchange, is the subject of a new book.

Rin Tin Tin the XXII, who recently presided over the ringing of the closing bell at the New York Stock exchange, is the subject of a new book.

The uniquely christened dog first came to public prominence on the TV show "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" during the 1950s and '60s, reports CBS News.

Susan Orlean, who has written a book about the legend of Rin Tin Tin, expressed joy at "the number of people who have declared 'Yo, Rinty,'” the show’s catchphrase-of-sorts.

The dog, who is presently the spokesdog for the American Humane Association, was hailed as Orlean as “a wonderful symbol of something innocently heroic,” CBS News reports.

She said the dog is “a living being who has embodied qualities that we have always thought of as American - of being independent, of being tough and brave."

For her book "Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend,” Orlean spent a decade sourcing the facts.

She had some help from Kevin Hallaran, archivist at the Metropolitan Museum, in Riverside, Calif., which is also home to Lee Duncan, a young World War I American gunnery corporal, reports CBS News.

The film "Finding Rin Tin Tin," shows Duncan discovering a family of German Shepherds following a battle in France.

He names one of the dogs Rin Tin, after a popular French folklore character, before bringing him to the U.S., and going as far as writing a screenplay especially for him. Duncan’s film, entitled “Where The North Begins,” was soon taken on by the fledgling Warner Brothers, CBS News reports. The film was a commercial and critical success, and Rin Tin Tin became known as "The dog who saved Warner Brothers" and "The dog who saved Hollywood." "He was probably the most profitable star Warner Brothers had," Orlean noted. "Every time they got into trouble, they would release a Rin Tin Tin film and bail themselves out. So they referred to him as 'the mortgage lifter,’” she said, reports CBS News.  
1 2 Next
Print Article